Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy

Poison Ivy

Growing in many places along the trail, Toxicodendron radicans, commonly known as eastern poison ivy or poison ivy, is a poisonous Asian and Eastern North American flowering plant that is well-known for causing contact dermatitis, an itchy, irritating, and sometimes painful rash, in most people who touch it.

The leaves of the poison ivy vine are trifoliate with three almond-shaped leaflets. Leaf color ranges from light green to dark green, turning bright red in fall. The leaflets are 1.2 to 4.7 inches long, and sometimes up to 12 inches. Each leaflet has a few or no teeth along its edge, and the leaf surface is smooth. Leaflet clusters alternate on the vine and the plant has no thorns. Vines growing on the trunk of a tree become firmly attached through numerous aerial rootlets.